Writeful

a weblog for readers and writers

Name:
Location: Baltimore-DC Area

Author who writes for a living and lives for writing. // WOMB: a novel in utero (Merge Publishing 2017) // TRACKS: A Novel in Stories (Atticus Books 2011) // FLIGHTLESS GOOSE, a storybook for children (Writers Lair Books 2008) // www.EricDGoodman.com

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Di Died 20 Years Ago

It’s hard to believe that it was 20 years ago today that Princess Diana died. In those days, we rushed to our television sets for news of the tragedy, not our cell phones or even our computers.  I remember being inspired that very weekend to write something about the event. But, in a way, it wasn’t the event itself that inspired me as much as how much attention it garnered.



Di Did Die (But So Did I) was published on the 10th anniversary of Princess Diana’s death in The Arabesque Review, both in print and online. It’s about the death of Princess Diana and the media craze that both helped cause it and surrounded it, making the moment larger than life. But it’s also about the inequality of fame, how one person can garner so much attention while thousands of others go unnoticed.



You can read Di Did Die (But So Did I) in The Arabesque Review, originally published in 2007, at the link below.




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Monday, August 28, 2017

Zip Through Shanghai with Hackwriters

My travel story about Shanghai was published on in the British online magazine Hackwriters.

Hackwriters, an online portfolio of good writing, has been digitally archived in the British Library since it began in 1999 and has been affiliated with Falmouth University and University of Portsmouth before becoming independent.

“The sheer density of Shanghai sort of hits you in the face as you drive into it. Some say the city is literally sinking under the weight of it own development. It’s also said that half of the construction cranes working in the world are in China—and most of them are right here in Shanghai.”

The story covers Yu Gardens and Bazaar, Huxinting Tea House, the Bundt and Pudong, a trip on the world’s only magnetically levitating train, a look at some of the tallest buildings in the world, and more. Shanghai doesn’t slow down, and neither does this story.

Read “Shanghai in the Fast Lane” in Hackwriters!






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Monday, August 21, 2017

On Inspiration, Concept, Voice, and Research

What inspired Womb: a novel in utero? Where did the concept come from? How did the voice develop? What kind of research went into making sure the fantastical story was suspended in plausible fact?

These are some of the questions answered during the question and answer session of the Enoch Pratt’s book launch of Womb: a novel in utero, part of the library’s Writers LIVE! Series. A member of the audience shared this clip, recorded during the session.


If you prefer professional audio, you’ll want to listen to the Enoch Pratt’s official podcast recording of the event—complete with introductions by Judy Cooper and Gregg Wilhelm, and a reading and question and answer session with the author.



But if you prefer bootleg video, and want answers to those specific questions, this is for you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJ8PCrO5teA


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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Bootleg of Enoch Pratt’s Writers LIVE: Eric D. Goodman, Womb: a novel in utero

Do you prefer video to audio? Then you’re in luck. We came across this bootleg smartphone video recording of the Enoch Pratt Library’s launch for Womb: a novel in utero as part of their Writers LIVE! Series.

If you prefer professional audio, you’ll want to listen to the Enoch Pratt’s official podcast recording of the event—complete with introductions by Judy Cooper and Gregg Wilhelm, and a reading and question and answer session with the author.

              
But if you prefer bootleg video, this is for you.

https://goo.gl/photos/PoN9wodH9ktqs4Db7

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Monday, August 07, 2017

Steve Himmer on Womb: Highly Attuned, Deeply Inquisitive Novel

Steve Himmer of Emerson College is the author of such novels as Scratch, Fram, and The Bee-Loud Glade. What was Steve's reaction to Womb: a novel in utero?

"Womb’s wise before his years narrator has a whole world to show us — our own — if only we, and his own struggling parents, can remember how to listen past the noise of our busy postnatal lives. He knows big things we’ve forgotten and he knows he’ll forget them soon, too, but this highly attuned, deeply inquisitive novel gives us a welcome chance to be reminded of what is always already there."

-- Steve Himmer,
    Author of Scratch, Fram, and The Bee-Loud Glade

Learn more about Steve and his work at http://stevehimmer.com.


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Tuesday, August 01, 2017

Nathan Leslie on Womb: Inventive, Tender, Remarkable, Scintillating Prose

Nathan Leslie is the author of nine books and counting, including Sibs, Madre, and The Tall Tale of Tommy Twice. What did Nathan think about Womb: a novel in utero?

"Leave it to Eric D. Goodman to have the imagination to narrate his latest risk-taking novel,Womb, in utero.  The point of view here is not only inimitable and inventive in its fly-on-the-wall approach, but Goodman’s novel also brings the goods in scintillating prose.  A truly tender, remarkable story.  You won’t read another novel like Eric D. Goodman's Womb anywhere."

-- Nathan Leslie
    author of Sibs, Madre, and The Tall Tale of Tommy Twice 

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