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Location: Baltimore-DC Area

Author // Represented by The Doris S. Michaels Literary Agency, Inc. // TRACKS: A Novel in Stories (Atticus Books 2011) & Flightless Goose, a storybook for children (Writers Lair Books 2008) available now. Learn more at www.EricDGoodman.com

Monday, July 14, 2014

Get Tangled in the Ivy with Loch Raven Review

Anytime is a good time to get tangled in The Ivy Bookshop. But Friday, July 25 at 7 p.m. is an especially good time.
That’s when The Ivy will host the Loch Raven Review reading and a Memorial Tribute to the late Baltimore poet, Dino Pantazonis.

The event will feature a host of authors, including Grace Cavalieri, Clarinda Harris, D.R. Belz, Carol Bindel, Brett Busang, Dan Cuddy, David Eberhardt, Christopher T. George, Sid Gold, Eric D. Goodman, Keith Alan Hamilton, Danuta E. Kosk-Kosicka, Charles Rammelkamp, Steve Weaver, Katherine E. Young, and surprise musical guests.

Admission and refreshments are free.

Learn more at The Ivy’s website.

http://www.theivybookshop.com/upcomingevent/10489

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Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Get on Board at Litmore

Hop aboard for a literary event that will take you from DC to Chicago! It takes place this Friday, July 11 at 7 p.m. at Litmore, located at 1702 South Road in Baltimore.


Join Litmore in welcoming Kathleen Rooney, Tom Glenn and Eric D. Goodman for the event “Get on Board: Readings from DC to Chicago.” They will read from their novels which range from DC to Chicago by way of Baltimore
 

Litmore is a brick and mortar nexus for writers with a mission of supporting community-based organizations and programs and creating a foundation for the long-term sustainability of the literary arts in Baltimore.
 
Following the “Get on Board” readings will be an opportunity to ask the authors questions about their books, their own tracks to publication, and writing in general. Then, be sure to chat with the authors during the book signing.
 
Learn more about the event—and sign in—at www.facebook.com/events/282868091874281/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming.
 
 


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Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Lunch is on Me at Syndic

Who says there’s no such thing as a free lunch? An abridged version of my story, “Late Lunch” was published in the most recent issue of San Francisco’s Syndic Literary Journal.

Syndic Literary Journal finds its roots in 1958 San Francisco when LeRoy Chatfield first began the journal. Today, LeRoy continues to publish the journal with every story and poem presented in digital ink as well as audio format.

In the current issue, you’ll find a story by Nitin Jagdish and poetry by Charles Rammelkamp. Check out the current issue at http://syndicjournal.us/cover-syndic-no-11/.

Whether you want to read it or listen, Lunch is on me at http://syndicjournal.us/cover-syndic-no-11/story-late-lunch-by-eric-d-goodman.


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Monday, June 09, 2014

Time to Play at Lit and Art

Lit and Art is known for fiction, poetry, nonfiction, music, and art. This time around, we’re throwing a short play into the mix.
The next event in the Lit and Art Reading Series takes place on Sunday, June 29 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Watermark Gallery across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
Featured talent on June 29 include Virginia Crawford, Wayne Countryman, Alexander Hewitt, and Ami Spencer. Live music performed by singer/songwriter Goodloe Byron, original artwork by Manzar, and wine and refreshments will fill out the program.
Hosted by Baltimore authors Nitin Jagdish and Eric D. Goodman, the event takes place at The Watermark Gallery at 100 S. Charles Street, across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in the BOA building, and takes place from 2 to 5 p.m.
Bring a bit of your own work to share at open mic.
Well into its seventh year, the Lit & Art reading series showcases local, national, and international talent—fiction, poetry, non-fiction, memoir, original art, live music—all topped off with wine, refreshments, and conversation.
Come find out why Lit and Art has been called the best excuse to get lit on a Sunday afternoon in Baltimore.
Learn more about the Watermark Gallery at the online gallery.

Find out more about Lit and Art and the featured talent at the Lit and Art Facebook Page.

Stay Tuned to Writeful for more news on Lit and Art and events like this one.

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Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Goonies by Goodman


News Flash from the 80’s

News that was as insignificant in the 1980s as it is today:

In 1985 or so, author and then high school student Eric D. Goodman completed a script treatment and began first few dozen pages of the novel, Goonies 2.

In the exciting book, Samwise the hobbit, then a Goonie, was to lead a crew of misfits on a perilous adventure through the seven seas in pursuit of one-eyed Willie’s rich stuff. With him: Michael Jackson’s best friend, a George W. Bush/Tommy Lee Jones impersonator, Dan Akroyd playing a Conehead, a Short Round look a like, and several others.

Fueled by an invigorating soundtrack of Cyndi Lauper’s “Good Enough,” James Hornor’s “Goonie’s Main Theme,” and other motivational songs of the era, the project was a surefire hit. Until Goodman, who lived in Sasebo, Japan at the time, discovered the temptations of pachinko bars and vending-machine pony kegs.  It was when he sat on a street bench at 2 a.m. trying to convince authorities that his thermos of sake was really American-style orange juice that he gave up on the project. Richard Donnor, who had been ready to greenlight the project, didn’t even bother to read the treatment, disgusted by Goodman’s fall into the pachinko underworld.

Now, nearly 30 years later, as Hollywood considers making a Goonies sequel, Goonies fans everywhere are clamoring for a Godman-written  the novelization of the movie script.

When asked for comment, Goodman offered to get back to us as soon as he finished playing pachinko on smartphone. We have yet to hear from him.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Goodman's Got a Brand New Website

Got a few minutes? Check out the new website, www.EricDGoodman.com.

What will you find there?

Short stories. Travel stories and pictures. Articles about writing. Information about books, both published and forthcoming. Novel excerpts. Train stories. A full list of upcoming readings, book signings and literary events. Blurbs and reviews. Press kits. Videos. Opportunities to connect. Interviews. Even a guided tour of the home writing studio.

Whether you want to read a short story or have one read to you, check out a novel excerpt or read an illustrated travel story, peruse a press kit or watch a video, the place to go is www.EricDGoodman.com.

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Monday, May 19, 2014

Steve Berry Lends a Hand to Poe House

International Bestseller Steve Berry is stopping by the B&O Railroad museum this week to help out Baltimore’s Poe House.

I met Steve Berry about ten years ago when he had just published his second book. Since his first novel was published in 2003, he’s had about 17 bestselling thrillers published. He keeps as busy as his globetrotting characters.

History is at the heart of his thrillers and adventures, and his “History Matters” foundation strives to save and preserve endangered historic buildings.

Steve will participate in a reception and give a talk at the B&O Museum on May 22 with proceeds going to Poe Baltimore and the Edgar Allan Poe House. Note that the events are being hosted at the B&O Museum at 901 West Pratt Street and not at the Poe House.

Learn more and get your tickets at www.poeinbaltimore.org/events/2014/05/best-selling-thriller-writer-steve-berry-to-help-save-literary-landmark-poe-house-in-baltimore

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Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Looking for Lit

Lookin’ for lit in all the wrong places? Find an afternoon of lit, sprinkled with music, garnished with art, and drenched in wine and refreshments on the last Sunday of the month.
The next event in the Lit and Art Reading Series takes place on Sunday, May 25 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Watermark Gallery across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
Featured readers on April 27 include D.R. Belz, Kathy Cottle, Sid Gold, Nancy Green and Jessica Gregg. Live music performed by singer/songwriter Goodloe Byron, original artwork by Manzar, and wine and refreshments will fill out the program.
Hosted by Baltimore authors Nitin Jagdish and Eric D. Goodman, the event takes place at The Watermark Gallery at 100 S. Charles Street, across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in the BOA building, and takes place from 2 to 5 p.m.
Bring a bit of your own work to share at open mic.
Well into its seventh year, the Lit & Art reading series showcases local, national, and international talent—fiction, poetry, non-fiction, memoir, original art, live music—all topped off with wine, refreshments, and conversation.
Come find out why Lit and Art has been called the best excuse to get lit on a Sunday afternoon in Baltimore.

Learn more about the Watermark Gallery at the online gallery.

Find out more about Lit and Art and the featured talent at the Lit and Art Facebook Page.


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Friday, May 02, 2014

Wee Dram of Scotland

We returned from our week in Scotland just in time to attend the most recent Lit & Art event. The week gave us just a wee taste of Scotland, and a few drams of scotch as well.
Our trip started with a nice day revisiting some of our favorite places in London: Westminster, the Abbey, Parliament, Big Ben, National Gallery, Portrait Gallery, and a taste of Fish and Chips.
We flew into Scotland early in the morning and didn’t waste any time, stowing our bags at the train station and exploring Edinburgh’s Royal Mile—filled with medieval stone buildings that decent for a mile from Edinburgh Castle (on an extinct volcano) and Holyrood Palace (the Queen’s Scottish residence). The Royal Mile ended up being our go-to place during our time in Edinburgh, where we visited a number of museums, galleries, and pubs. Meat and ale pies and fish and chips were favorites.
In Glasgow, we enjoyed touring the campus of University of Glasgow, Kelvingrove Art Gallery, Museum, and Park, the Mackintosh House, Hunterian Museum and Gallery, George Square, St. Mungro Museum, and Glasgow Cathedral. Neeps and Tatties were good in Glasgow, and so was the fish and chips.
Stirling’s medieval old-town was refreshing, not quite as crowded as the larger cities. The castle and medieval church were interesting, as were the pubs and restaurants. We enjoyed a deluxe Scotch flight (about 20 of them) at the Curly Coo—voted best whisky bar in the world two years in a row. In Stirling, we tried haggis, and fish and chips.
Our voyage through the highlands brought us some of the most diverse and dramatic scenery we’ve seen in one day’s time. Mountains and valleys, mist and sun, green moss and desert wastelands. Highlights included Loch Lomond, Glencoe, Rannoch Moor, Ben Nevis, and Loch Ness.
When we took our voyage into Loch Ness, it began raining. The water was choppy and the horizon was misty. We think we spotted Nessie, but it was hard to tell in the rain and mist. We debated our findings over fish and chips.
We searched Rosslyn Chapel outside Edinburgh, but didn’t find anything not already uncovered in Da Vinci Code.
We ended our Scottish adventures where they began, along the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, where we had one last pub meal of meat pies, fish and chips, and ale and scotch.
People have already asked: which city had the best fish and chips and which was our favorite scotch?
We may need to return for another taste test.

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Friday, April 18, 2014

My Nessie Lies Over the Ocean

The Week Magazine: Concern is growing in Scotland over the fate of the fabled Loch Ness monster, which hasn’t been spotted in 18 months—the longest stretch without a sighting in 90 years. 

“It’s very upsetting news,” said accountant and Nessie expert Gary Campbell. Campbell, who has collected 1,036 reports of sightings, including some dating back 1,500 years, thinks the prehistoric creature is still alive. “I’m convinced that Nessie has just taken some time out,” he said, “and will be back with a vengeance this year.”

Me: I’ve got this. I’m off to Scotland today. Spending some time in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Stirling, the Highlands, and—yes—Loch Ness. I’ll find Nessie. If you don’t hear from me in the next couple weeks and I don’t show up at the next Lit & Art event, better stark poking around Loch Ness.


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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Off to the Highlands

I’ve been feeling a wee bit peckish for some tatties and neeps, so I’m off to Scotland.

We’re stopping for a day in London along the way and plan to stroll the Thames, listen to the chimes of Big Ben at Parliament, pay a visit to Buckingham Palace, and peek into the National Gallery, Portrait Gallery, and Tate before taking the tube from Piccadilly Circus back to Heathrow.

In Scotland, we’ll spend most of our time in Edinburgh and Glasgow. We look forward to a stroll along the Royal Mile, visit to Edinburgh Castle and Hollyrood Palace and all of the wonderful museums and sites between the two. We’ll explore the works of Mackintosh in Glasgow and take in the religious relics and modern art.

Sterling Castle and Rosslyn Chapel are also on the list, as well as an exploration of Loch Lomond, the highlands, and Loch Ness. Fingers crossed that we’ll spot Nessie.

Hold the haggis, heavy on the scotch, and let the bagpipes hum.

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Monday, April 14, 2014

Rafael Alvarez Joins Lit and Art

Join us on April 27 and discover “the best excuse to get lit on a Sunday afternoon in Baltimore.”
Well into its seventh year, the Lit & Art reading series showcases local, national, and international talent—fiction, poetry, non-fiction, memoir, original art, live music—all topped off with wine, refreshments, and conversation.
Featured readers on April 27 include Rafael Alvarez, Ann Bracken, Barbara Diehl, Toby Devens, and Danuta Kosk-Kosicka. Live Pop-Grass music of Jacob Panic, original art by Manzar, and wine and refreshments will fill out the program.
Hosted by Baltimore authors Nitin Jagdish and Eric D. Goodman, the event takes place at The Watermark Gallery at 100 S. Charles Street, across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in the BOA building, and takes place from 2 to 5 p.m. Bring a bit of your own work to share at open mic!
Learn more about the Watermark Gallery at the online gallery.

Find out more about Lit and Art and the featured talent at the Lit and Art Facebook Page.

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Friday, April 11, 2014

National Book Award Winner Headlines 11th Annual CityLit Festival

This Saturday, April 12, get ready to celebrate the Baltimore literary arts in a big way! The 11th annual CityLit Festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Enoch Pratt Free Library Central Library, 400 Cathedral Street in downtown Baltimore.

This year, the headliner is the 2013 National Book Award winner James McBride. Past participant in the festival have been Edward P. Jones, Junot Diaz, Stanley Plumly, and George Saunders.

The event will include a multitude of programs from readings to lectures, and the literary market place will be in the main hall all day.

I’ll be there with copies of Tracks: A Novel in stories, Flightless Goose, and information about the next Lit & Art at the Watermark.

Learn more at the CityLit Festival Facebook Page!
www.facebook.com/pages/CityLit-Project/216742435019875

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Wednesday, April 09, 2014

We Dug China


We enjoyed a wonderful two weeks exploring China. What did we dig most about the ancient nation? Figuring out where to begin can be as complicated as a Chinese puzzle box.

We began our time in Beijing. We strolled Tiananmen Square, the largest square in the world. We explored the Forbidden City and visited the Imperial Palace. We danced and sang with the locals at the Summer Palace. A rickshaw ride through the Hutong brought us face to face with world-renowned Cricket Leo and lunch with his family (of people, birds, animals, and insects). And Beijing Zoo gave us a glimpse of the giant pandas.

Then we explored the original capitol of unified China, Xi’an, and it’s 5,000 year history. We marveled at the thick, 9-mile city wall, climbed the Drum and Bell towers, rang the prayer bell at Wild Goose Pagoda in Jianfu Temple, and took a crazy motorized rickshaw ride through heavy traffic going the wrong way into bus-filled round-a-bouts.

The Terra Cotta Army protecting China’s first emperor was impressive, being one of the greatest archeological finds of the 20th century. We even met one of the four peasants who discovered the warriors while digging a well.

Suzhou, the Venice of the East, saw us cruising along canals villages and admiring stone bridges and trees that touched the surface of the water. We walked ancient streets and took in the beautiful Lingering Garden. We even visited a farmer’s market with all sorts of livestock, from frogs and snakes to fish and goose. And we met a winemaker and sampled the rice wine of his 100-year old winery.

In Hangzhou, we cruised the West Lake, admired the Su Causeway and waterlogged pillars, and enjoyed some time at a tea plantation where we picked and tasted our own Longjing tea, watch it roasted in hot woks, and enjoyed a tea ceremony with the dragon-well tea so exclusive that it was once made only for the Emperor.

Shanghai surprises rounded out our trip with a skyline so amazing that it looked like something out of a futuristic movie. At the river, you could see the old European buildings at the Bund on one side, and the Pearl tower and futuristic skyscrapers in Pudong on the other. A ceremony was going on when we visited the Jade Buddha Temple. We hovered on the MagLev, climbed the JinMao Tower to stand next to the partially completed “second tallest building in the world,” explored Yu Gardens and Bazaar, explored the twisted side streets of the French Concession, enjoyed the Shanghai Museum, and even watched an ERA performance of Chinese acrobats.

What more did we do? A lot. We walked the Great Wall, one of the seven manmade wonders of the world. We visited a freshwater pearl factory, jade museum, silk factory, silk embroidery institute, Imperial Pharmacy of traditional Chinese medicine, and enjoyed lectures from experts on all of these.

There’s so much more we dug about China. But that will have to wait for the travel stories.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_heaven

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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Digging to China

If you don’t hear from me for a couple weeks, it’s because I’ll be on the other side of the world. Today, I’m digging to China. Tomorrow, I expect to be digging China.

Actually, we’re flying. New York to Beijing. In the weeks ahead, we’ll tour Beijing’s Tiananmen Square and Forbidden City, walk the Great Wall of China, inspect the Terra Cotta Army in the ancient Chinese capital of Xi’an, enjoy the canals of Suzhou, stroll the gardens of Hangzhou and see old China meet new China in Shanghai.

Of course, there’ll be a travel story in here—perhaps a few. And maybe even a novel set in the exotic settings. We’ll just have to see where the dust settles after we kick it up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

More than Just Lit and Art

The next event in the Lit and Art Reading Series takes place on Sunday, March 30 at The Watermark Gallery. As always, it includes a diverse selection of featured readers, live music, original art, wine and refreshments, and the opportunity to mix and mingle with the local literary and arts community.

But this month’s Lit & Art is more than that. It is also a celebration of Persian New Year. And the closing reception of Manzar’s art exhibit, “Women West, Women East & Global Peace.”
The event takes place from 2 to 5 p.m. and may go longer if you want to stay to enjoy the celebration with Persian music, food and entertainment.
Our Featured readers in March are William Patrick Tandy, Julie Fisher, Sam J. Schmidt, g emil rutter and Diane Sahms Gaurnieri with music by Pop-Grass Banjo Dude Jacob Panic.
The art exhibit celebrates women from the east and the west and expresses a desire for world peace. “I hope in the near future we will have more wise women involved in politics,” said Manzar. “I believe this will lead us to a more peaceful world.”
Manzar, a resident of Baltimore, will be at the opening reception to talk about her work. She was born in Tehran, Iran. She has exhibited her work throughout the country and around the world.
“I strive for peace and beauty in all my works,” said Manzar, who also coordinates a “Teach Your Heart with Art” workshop.
The Watermark Gallery is located on the second floor of the Bank of America Building at 100 South Charles Street across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
To learn more, visit www.WatermarkGallery.com or call the gallery at 410.547.0452.
Visit Manzar and her work at www.Manzar.net.
Learn more about the Lit and Art Reading Series at www.facebook.com/#!/groups/LitAndArt/.

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Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Help Me Board The Train

Over the past few weeks, dozens of friends, family, colleagues and connections have emailed, messaged, and posted to me about the new Amtrak Writer-in Residence program. Hey, I’m on board with that! I’ve written on an Amtrak train before and I’ll be happy to do it again!

I’m gratified that so many people thought of me when they heard about the Amtrak residency. I guess it makes sense since my debut work of fiction, Tracks: A Novel in Stories is set on an Amtrak train traveling from Baltimore to Chicago. And my book has been called a virtual love letter to train travel. It’s all about the passengers on the train and how they connect and touch one another in unexpected ways. But it’s very much a pro-train travel book.

Although I wrote Tracks before ever taking the Cardinal line from Baltimore to Chicago, I did do some editing of the manuscript while on the rails—doing research to make sure I had the details correct. And getting a feel for what such a long-distance voyage on Amtrak’s Cardinal was like. I’d love to do it again.

So if you have a moment, help me get back on board the train. Tell Amtrak you think I’d make a good candidate for their new writer-in-residence program. It’s in its infancy and there is no set application process as of yet. Those who have been granted residencies thus far have done so after being discovered by Amtrak on social media.

I’m not asking you to write a letter or even an email. Just a quick tweet with @Amtrak or Facebook post on the www.facebook.com/Amtrak page. Or a short message by Facebook, Twitter, or email telling Amtrak “Eric D. Goodman, who already wrote a book set on an Amtrak train, would be a perfect candidate for the Amtrak Writer-in-Residence program.”

And if I make it, I’ll tweet and post and message you all along the ride as I work on my next novel.


You may be interested in getting on board yourself. Learn more about Amtrak’s Writer-in-Residence program at www.thewire.com/culture/2014/02/inside-amtraks-absolutely-awesome-plan-give-free-rides-writers/358332/.

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Monday, February 24, 2014

New Course: Those Next Uncharted Steps

If you haven’t picked up the most recent issue of Scribble Literary Magazine, you can still get it online at www.scribblemagazine.us.

Scribble volume 8 issue 3 features my story, “New Course.” In the story, Gene Silverman comes face to face with the hit man his old boss has sent after him. “New Course” is a story from Tracks: A Novel in Stories.

“Looking back was only slowing him down. He took a deep breath and faced forward.”

Coincidentally, the story seems to have a theme that goes along with Sherry Audette Morrow’s editor’s message about loss and changes and the need to “muster the courage necessary to get up off the bench and take those next uncharted steps.”

Learn more at www.scribblemagazine.us/Current_Issue.html.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Olympians of Lit and Art


Take a break from the games in Sochi and join the Olympians of lit and art. The next event in the Lit and Art Reading Series takes place this Sunday, February 23 from 2 to 5 p.m. at The Watermark Gallery, 100 South Charles Street on the second floor of the Bank of America building across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

Featured this month are Elisabeth Dahl, Barbara DeCesare, Jen Grow, Charles Rammelkamp and Earl Crown. The original artwork of Manzar is on display, and live pop-grass music will be performed by Jacob Panic.

The event—including the wine and refreshments—is free and open to the public. Take your place on the platform and bring 5 minutes of your own work to share during open mic.

Don’t just sit on your couch and watch the Olympics. Join the Olympians of lit and art!

www.facebook.com/groups/LitAndArt

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