Writeful

a weblog for writers and readers

Name:
Location: Baltimore-DC Area

Author // Represented by The Doris S. Michaels Literary Agency, Inc. // TRACKS: A Novel in Stories (Atticus Books 2011) & Flightless Goose, a storybook for children (Writers Lair Books 2008) available now. Learn more at www.EricDGoodman.com

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

GEO-POE at Westminster Hall


Looking for a bookish Halloween event? Or a Halloween Literary event? Tonight’s the night. Join the CityLit Project at Westminster Hall (the final resting place of Edgar Allan Poe) for GEO-POE

In October 2014, fourteen writers hid fourteen stories inspired by the death of Edgar Allan Poe or written in a Poesque fashion. Geo-cached in spots around Baltimore, each story is part of a puzzle that is GEO-POE: A Literary Geo-Caching Adventure.

www.facebook.com/geopoebaltimore

Free Fall Baltimore Event
Geo-Poe: The Reading
Oct 29, 7pm at Westminster Hall
Please RSVP for free admission here
http://bit.ly/1yHDH4Y

At last, let the identities of these fourteen warped writers be revealed!

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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The End Has Come


For the 2014 Lit and Art Reading Series, that is.

The final Lit and Art of the 2014 season takes place the last Sunday in October—this weekend! Featured readers include David Andrews, Shirley Brewer, Anthony C. Hayes, Richard Peabody, and Trish S.

Classical piano will be performed by Tom Glenn. The original artwork of Manzar will be on display, and you can help yourself to free wine and refreshments.  Nithin Jagdish and Eric D. Goodman are your welcoming hosts. Plus, open mic offers the opportunity for you to show us what you’ve got.

Join us for the last Lit and Art of the 2014 season on Sunday, October 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at The Watermark Gallery, 100 South Charles Street, second floor of the Bank of America Building right across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

 
Pledge your intention to attend the event at the event page:
 

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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

NaNoWriMo One Month Early


Do you do NaNoWriMo? It’s right around the corner. NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month, takes place every November—a month of pens and paper, desktops and lap tops, coffee and creativity. The goal: to write a novel of 50,000 words or more in one month’s time.

I used to be a perennial participant. I won NaNoWriMo five years in a row. Then I realized that I had lots of decent first drafts of novels, but not enough polished final drafts, so I stopped.

I had thought of participating again this year, but I just couldn’t wait. So I decided to do it one month early. I started writing when the calendar turned to October, and I expect to have a draft completed before the trick-or-treaters arrive on the doorstep.

NaNoWriMo is more motivator than contest. It’s sort of like a marathon. You have to be a regular writer who practices, have to train yourself for the event. But if you do, and if you’re driven, you can write a novel in a month. And it’s a great feeling.

Then comes the rewriting and the editing. But there are plenty more months for that.

Whether you decide to participate in National Novel Writing Month or you decide on the month that best fits your schedule and mood, write on!

Look for more details on my latest novel, set in China, in the months to come. Until then, check out some of the places I visited earlier this year that found their way into the novel!

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Tuesday, October 07, 2014

Last Lit and Art of the Year


Last month, the Lit and Art Reading Series took its place once again at the Baltimore Book Festival—the Mid-Atlantic Region’s biggest literary celebration! We were hosted by the CityLit Stage—the hottest stage of the festival! Featured talent included Tom Glenn, Eric D. Goodman, Holly Morse-Ellington, Nitin Jagdish, Nathan Leslie, and Liz Moser. The event was emceed by NPR’s Aaron Henkin, whose program “The Signal” takes listeners on a weekly tour of Baltimore’s cultural landscape.

But we’re not ones to dwell on the past. Let’s look to the future.

The final Lit and Art of the 2014 season takes place the last Sunday in October! Featured readers will include David Andrews, Shirley Brewer, Tony Hayes, Richard Peabody, and Trish S.

Musical interludes of classical piano will be performed by Tom Glenn. The original artwork of Manzar will be on display, and the program will be held together with wine and refreshments. Plus, open mic will offer the opportunity for you to show your talent as well.

Join us for the last Lit and Art of the 2014 season on Sunday, October 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at The Watermark Gallery, 100 South Charles Street, second floor of the Bank of America Building right across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Get Your Lit On at Baltimore Book Festival City Lit Stage

For many in the local literary community, this is the Literary New Year celebration. It's time to get your lit on!

Yes, it’s that season again—time for the Baltimore Book Festival. It’s the Mid-Atlantic Region’s biggest literary celebration! The event takes place from Friday, September 26 at noon to Sunday, September 28 at 6 p.m.

Once again, the Lit and Art Reading Series has a place at the Baltimore Book Festival’s CityLit Stage—the hottest stage of the festival! Our program takes place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, September 26 and features Tom Glenn, Eric D. Goodman, Holly Morse-Ellington, Nitin Jagdish, Nathan Leslie, Liz Moser, and Manzar. The event will be emceed by NPR’s Aaron Henkin, whose program “The Signal” takes listeners on a weekly tour of Baltimore’s cultural landscape.

Other featured writers participating in this year’s festival include Alice McDermott, Rafael Alvarez, Jessica Anya Blau, Sid Gold, Jen Michalski, Lalita Noronha, and a multitude of others.

Learn more about this year’s Baltimore Book Festival at www.baltimorebookfestival.org.

Go right to the CityLit Stage!

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Lit and Art at Baltimore Book Fest


It’s that season again—time for the Baltimore Book Festival. It’s the Mid-Atlantic Region’s biggest literary celebration! The event takes place from Friday, September 26 at noon to Sunday, September 28 at 6 p.m.

Once again, the Lit and Art Reading Series has a place at the Baltimore Book Festival’s CityLit Stage—the hottest stage of the festival! Our program takes place at 2 p.m. on Sunday, September 26 and features Tom Glenn, Eric D. Goodman, Holly Morse-Ellington, Nitin Jagdish, Nathan Leslie, Liz Moser, and Manzar of the Watermark Gallery. The event will be emceed by NPR’s Aaron Henkin, whose program “The Signal” takes listeners on a weekly tour of Baltimore’s cultural landscape.

Other featured writers participating in this year’s festival include Alice McDermott, Rafael Alvarez, Jessica Anya Blau, Sid Gold, Jen Michalski, Lalita Noronha, and a multitude of others.

Learn more about this year’s Baltimore Book Festival at www.baltimorebookfestival.org.

Go right to the CityLit Stage!

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Wednesday, September 03, 2014

A Charming Place for Writing and Reading


Do you know about The Historic York Inn / Smyser Bair House?

It’s just the place for a quiet writing retreat!

Located in the four-block historic district of downtown York, this 1830’s home is about an hour north of Baltimore. The luxurious mansion is filled with historic details—gilded Pier Mirrors, stained-glass windows, inlayed floors, massive wood doors and banisters, crystal and brass chandeliers, and hand-plastered molding. Step into the inn and you’ll feel as though you’ve stepped back in time.

On the National Register of Historic Properties and the York Walking Tour, the home boasts nine comfortable guest rooms. Whether you’re visiting for a rest or to work, it’s a great place to get away.

For the visitor, it’s centrally located to a number of destinations: York, Gettysburg, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Hershey, Lancaster, Baltimore, Washington DC, and a number of interesting sights nearby. The central location makes The Historic York Inn well-positioned for an extended vacation of day trips.

For the city-dweller, it is also a perfect location — because it is in walking distance to everything: the Visitor’s Center, the Central Market and Farmer’s Market (featured as one of the top ten historic markets in the U.S. by the Food Network), the Strand-Capitol Historic Theater and Performing Arts Center, fine and casual dining, restaurants and night clubs, boutique shops, art galleries, antique shops, museums, the colonial courthouse, Historic Trust, Penn Park, the bus station, the new Baseball Stadium, office buildings, countless historic markers, and even the original Articles of Confederation which established the United States of America. It’s easy to be a "guest about town" when you live in this mansion.

For those wanting a working vacation, it’s a great place for a writing retreat, artist retreat, or just a relaxing setting for curling up with some books you’ve been meaning to read.

The home has been featured on national television, in magazines—and even made the top story on the front page of the York newspaper when we purchased it!

Want to book a stay for a night, week or month, or just schedule a tour? Simply email YorkInn@gmail.com.

Learn more about The Historic York Inn / Smyser Bair House by visiting the website at www.YorkInn.info.

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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Celebrate Books Capitol Style

The National Book Festival in Washington DC is early this year! This weekend, join lit lovers from across the nation on the National Mall for the 2014 Library of Congress National Book Festival. The celebration takes place on this Friday, August 29.

Featured authors and poets include E.L. Doctorow, Claire Messud, Alice McDermott, Lisa See, Billy Collins, and Baltimore’s own Elisabeth Dahl, a previous featured author at the Lit and Art Reading Series.  

This year there are even special evening events on movie adaptations, poetry, graphic novels, and Mexican literary legends.

Learn more and get the full schedule at the Library of Congress website.

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Monday, August 18, 2014

Let's Check Out Czech Republic


My travel story, “The Pleasures of Prague (And Proximity),” was published in a recent issue of World Wide Travel.

It’s been a few years since the visit, but it’s as vivid today as it was when we were roaming the stone streets of the ancient city. The City of a Thousand Spires was a wonderful place to spend a week. Learn all about what we did there—and see pictures—at World Wide Travel.

In addition to the many sights of Prague, we ventured off to nearby Kunta Hora, Karlstein, Chodova Plana, and Plzen.

It’s a long travelogue, so you may want to pack an overnight bag for “The Pleasures of Prague (And Proximity).”  Then, join me in exploring this eastern European treasure at World Wide Travel.


 

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Monday, August 11, 2014

Are You Big Enough?


Are you big enough for your own website?

That’s a question a lot of authors ask themselves, and one that I considered. It’s the subject of my latest feature article at Writers Weekly, the world’s highest-circulation freelance writers subscription ezine.

I used to keep individual websites for each book. Then, my agent convinced me that if you have published works to share, you’re big enough for your own author’s website.

So now, I keep it all under one roof at www.EricDGoodman.com.

Where is your online presence?

Read my article, “You’re Big Enough For Your Own Website,” at Writers Weekly.

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Wednesday, August 06, 2014

My Daughter Helps Save Trees


Nicole, my teenage daughter, has never expressed an enthusiastic interest in writing. But she was just published in The Baltimore Sun twice this week. Her letter to the editor regarding the Dumbarton trees in Rodger’s Forge was published in the July 30 edition and again on Saturday, August 2 in the “Maryland Voices: Your Turn” section.

In “Spare the Dumbarton Trees,” Nicole says that the county’s plans to expand Dumbarton Middle School at the expense of century-old trees must be scrapped.

And her letter just may have made a difference! Not only did she get two personal letters from local politicians, the Saturday edition’s Editor’s Note said that some executives have withdrawn support for parts of the plan that involve destroying the trees.

Read Nicole’s letter at the following link.


And, a reply to her letter from another reader, “When nature is in your schoolyard,” was published in the Sun on August 3. You can read the letter here.


 

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Friday, August 01, 2014

The Good and Bad of Family Reunions


Recently, I went to a family reunion of sorts in celebration of my surviving grandmother’s 90th birthday. In the room were dozens of cousins, uncles, and family members, some of which I hadn’t seen in fifteen years. Five generations stood together in that room—a first in our family history. And best of all, we were not here for the more common sort of forced family reunion. We were here to celebrate 90 years of life well lived.

The other sort of reunion I mention reminds me of her husband’s funeral in 1988. I remember when my grandfather passed away, and the feeling that it was a shame we didn’t get together more often under happier circumstances.

The same tone was present last year at my other grandmother’s funeral. So it is refreshing to be celebrating life at a family reunion.

Not long ago, an abridged version of my short story, “Reunion,” was published in Syndic Literary Journal. Although it was written before my maternal grandmother’s death and paternal grandmother’s birthday, it hits on the theme of the unfortunate sort of family reunions and why it sometimes seems to be the most common kind.

In addition to “Reunion,” you’ll find a nice collection of fiction and poetry you can read or listen to in the latest issue. All available to read in digital ink, or to listen to in audio format.
 
LeRoy Chatfield founded the original Syndic in San Francisco and published it from 1958 to 1960. Fifty years later in 2010, Chatfield revived his Syndic Literary Journal and publishes it online at http://syndicjournal.us.
 
Go directly to “Reunion” at the following link.

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Monday, July 14, 2014

Get Tangled in the Ivy with Loch Raven Review

Anytime is a good time to get tangled in The Ivy Bookshop. But Friday, July 25 at 7 p.m. is an especially good time.
That’s when The Ivy will host the Loch Raven Review reading and a Memorial Tribute to the late Baltimore poet, Dino Pantazonis.

The event will feature a host of authors, including Grace Cavalieri, Clarinda Harris, D.R. Belz, Carol Bindel, Brett Busang, Dan Cuddy, David Eberhardt, Christopher T. George, Sid Gold, Eric D. Goodman, Keith Alan Hamilton, Danuta E. Kosk-Kosicka, Charles Rammelkamp, Steve Weaver, Katherine E. Young, and surprise musical guests.

Admission and refreshments are free.

Learn more at The Ivy’s website.

http://www.theivybookshop.com/upcomingevent/10489

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Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Get on Board at Litmore

Hop aboard for a literary event that will take you from DC to Chicago! It takes place this Friday, July 11 at 7 p.m. at Litmore, located at 1702 South Road in Baltimore.


Join Litmore in welcoming Kathleen Rooney, Tom Glenn and Eric D. Goodman for the event “Get on Board: Readings from DC to Chicago.” They will read from their novels which range from DC to Chicago by way of Baltimore
 

Litmore is a brick and mortar nexus for writers with a mission of supporting community-based organizations and programs and creating a foundation for the long-term sustainability of the literary arts in Baltimore.
 
Following the “Get on Board” readings will be an opportunity to ask the authors questions about their books, their own tracks to publication, and writing in general. Then, be sure to chat with the authors during the book signing.
 
Learn more about the event—and sign in—at www.facebook.com/events/282868091874281/?ref_dashboard_filter=upcoming.
 
 


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Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Lunch is on Me at Syndic

Who says there’s no such thing as a free lunch? An abridged version of my story, “Late Lunch” was published in the most recent issue of San Francisco’s Syndic Literary Journal.

Syndic Literary Journal finds its roots in 1958 San Francisco when LeRoy Chatfield first began the journal. Today, LeRoy continues to publish the journal with every story and poem presented in digital ink as well as audio format.

In the current issue, you’ll find a story by Nitin Jagdish and poetry by Charles Rammelkamp. Check out the current issue at http://syndicjournal.us/cover-syndic-no-11/.

Whether you want to read it or listen, Lunch is on me at http://syndicjournal.us/cover-syndic-no-11/story-late-lunch-by-eric-d-goodman.


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Monday, June 09, 2014

Time to Play at Lit and Art

Lit and Art is known for fiction, poetry, nonfiction, music, and art. This time around, we’re throwing a short play into the mix.
The next event in the Lit and Art Reading Series takes place on Sunday, June 29 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Watermark Gallery across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
Featured talent on June 29 include Virginia Crawford, Wayne Countryman, Alexander Hewitt, and Ami Spencer. Live music performed by singer/songwriter Goodloe Byron, original artwork by Manzar, and wine and refreshments will fill out the program.
Hosted by Baltimore authors Nitin Jagdish and Eric D. Goodman, the event takes place at The Watermark Gallery at 100 S. Charles Street, across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in the BOA building, and takes place from 2 to 5 p.m.
Bring a bit of your own work to share at open mic.
Well into its seventh year, the Lit & Art reading series showcases local, national, and international talent—fiction, poetry, non-fiction, memoir, original art, live music—all topped off with wine, refreshments, and conversation.
Come find out why Lit and Art has been called the best excuse to get lit on a Sunday afternoon in Baltimore.
Learn more about the Watermark Gallery at the online gallery.

Find out more about Lit and Art and the featured talent at the Lit and Art Facebook Page.

Stay Tuned to Writeful for more news on Lit and Art and events like this one.

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Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Goonies by Goodman


News Flash from the 80’s

News that was as insignificant in the 1980s as it is today:

In 1985 or so, author and then high school student Eric D. Goodman completed a script treatment and began first few dozen pages of the novel, Goonies 2.

In the exciting book, Samwise the hobbit, then a Goonie, was to lead a crew of misfits on a perilous adventure through the seven seas in pursuit of one-eyed Willie’s rich stuff. With him: Michael Jackson’s best friend, a George W. Bush/Tommy Lee Jones impersonator, Dan Akroyd playing a Conehead, a Short Round look a like, and several others.

Fueled by an invigorating soundtrack of Cyndi Lauper’s “Good Enough,” James Hornor’s “Goonie’s Main Theme,” and other motivational songs of the era, the project was a surefire hit. Until Goodman, who lived in Sasebo, Japan at the time, discovered the temptations of pachinko bars and vending-machine pony kegs.  It was when he sat on a street bench at 2 a.m. trying to convince authorities that his thermos of sake was really American-style orange juice that he gave up on the project. Richard Donnor, who had been ready to greenlight the project, didn’t even bother to read the treatment, disgusted by Goodman’s fall into the pachinko underworld.

Now, nearly 30 years later, as Hollywood considers making a Goonies sequel, Goonies fans everywhere are clamoring for a Godman-written  the novelization of the movie script.

When asked for comment, Goodman offered to get back to us as soon as he finished playing pachinko on smartphone. We have yet to hear from him.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Goodman's Got a Brand New Website

Got a few minutes? Check out the new website, www.EricDGoodman.com.

What will you find there?

Short stories. Travel stories and pictures. Articles about writing. Information about books, both published and forthcoming. Novel excerpts. Train stories. A full list of upcoming readings, book signings and literary events. Blurbs and reviews. Press kits. Videos. Opportunities to connect. Interviews. Even a guided tour of the home writing studio.

Whether you want to read a short story or have one read to you, check out a novel excerpt or read an illustrated travel story, peruse a press kit or watch a video, the place to go is www.EricDGoodman.com.

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Monday, May 19, 2014

Steve Berry Lends a Hand to Poe House

International Bestseller Steve Berry is stopping by the B&O Railroad museum this week to help out Baltimore’s Poe House.

I met Steve Berry about ten years ago when he had just published his second book. Since his first novel was published in 2003, he’s had about 17 bestselling thrillers published. He keeps as busy as his globetrotting characters.

History is at the heart of his thrillers and adventures, and his “History Matters” foundation strives to save and preserve endangered historic buildings.

Steve will participate in a reception and give a talk at the B&O Museum on May 22 with proceeds going to Poe Baltimore and the Edgar Allan Poe House. Note that the events are being hosted at the B&O Museum at 901 West Pratt Street and not at the Poe House.

Learn more and get your tickets at www.poeinbaltimore.org/events/2014/05/best-selling-thriller-writer-steve-berry-to-help-save-literary-landmark-poe-house-in-baltimore

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Tuesday, May 06, 2014

Looking for Lit

Lookin’ for lit in all the wrong places? Find an afternoon of lit, sprinkled with music, garnished with art, and drenched in wine and refreshments on the last Sunday of the month.
The next event in the Lit and Art Reading Series takes place on Sunday, May 25 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Watermark Gallery across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
Featured readers on April 27 include D.R. Belz, Kathy Cottle, Sid Gold, Nancy Green and Jessica Gregg. Live music performed by singer/songwriter Goodloe Byron, original artwork by Manzar, and wine and refreshments will fill out the program.
Hosted by Baltimore authors Nitin Jagdish and Eric D. Goodman, the event takes place at The Watermark Gallery at 100 S. Charles Street, across from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor in the BOA building, and takes place from 2 to 5 p.m.
Bring a bit of your own work to share at open mic.
Well into its seventh year, the Lit & Art reading series showcases local, national, and international talent—fiction, poetry, non-fiction, memoir, original art, live music—all topped off with wine, refreshments, and conversation.
Come find out why Lit and Art has been called the best excuse to get lit on a Sunday afternoon in Baltimore.

Learn more about the Watermark Gallery at the online gallery.

Find out more about Lit and Art and the featured talent at the Lit and Art Facebook Page.


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Friday, May 02, 2014

Wee Dram of Scotland

We returned from our week in Scotland just in time to attend the most recent Lit & Art event. The week gave us just a wee taste of Scotland, and a few drams of scotch as well.
Our trip started with a nice day revisiting some of our favorite places in London: Westminster, the Abbey, Parliament, Big Ben, National Gallery, Portrait Gallery, and a taste of Fish and Chips.
We flew into Scotland early in the morning and didn’t waste any time, stowing our bags at the train station and exploring Edinburgh’s Royal Mile—filled with medieval stone buildings that decent for a mile from Edinburgh Castle (on an extinct volcano) and Holyrood Palace (the Queen’s Scottish residence). The Royal Mile ended up being our go-to place during our time in Edinburgh, where we visited a number of museums, galleries, and pubs. Meat and ale pies and fish and chips were favorites.
In Glasgow, we enjoyed touring the campus of University of Glasgow, Kelvingrove Art Gallery, Museum, and Park, the Mackintosh House, Hunterian Museum and Gallery, George Square, St. Mungro Museum, and Glasgow Cathedral. Neeps and Tatties were good in Glasgow, and so was the fish and chips.
Stirling’s medieval old-town was refreshing, not quite as crowded as the larger cities. The castle and medieval church were interesting, as were the pubs and restaurants. We enjoyed a deluxe Scotch flight (about 20 of them) at the Curly Coo—voted best whisky bar in the world two years in a row. In Stirling, we tried haggis, and fish and chips.
Our voyage through the highlands brought us some of the most diverse and dramatic scenery we’ve seen in one day’s time. Mountains and valleys, mist and sun, green moss and desert wastelands. Highlights included Loch Lomond, Glencoe, Rannoch Moor, Ben Nevis, and Loch Ness.
When we took our voyage into Loch Ness, it began raining. The water was choppy and the horizon was misty. We think we spotted Nessie, but it was hard to tell in the rain and mist. We debated our findings over fish and chips.
We searched Rosslyn Chapel outside Edinburgh, but didn’t find anything not already uncovered in Da Vinci Code.
We ended our Scottish adventures where they began, along the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, where we had one last pub meal of meat pies, fish and chips, and ale and scotch.
People have already asked: which city had the best fish and chips and which was our favorite scotch?
We may need to return for another taste test.

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