Writeful

a weblog for readers and writers

Monday, October 26, 2020

Got Jadeite?

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Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Jacquelyn Mitchard on Jadeite: Tense, Romantic, Obsessed

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Sunday, October 18, 2020

Steve Berry on Jadeite: Tight, Taut, Terrific



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Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Tom Glenn on Jadeite: Literary Novel in Disguise


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Sunday, October 11, 2020

Katherine Cottle on Jadeite: Captivated and Entertained


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Thursday, October 08, 2020

Jerry Holt on Jadeite: The Maltese Falcon on high-octane!


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Tuesday, October 06, 2020

Toby Devens on Jadeite: Clever, Witty, Captivating


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Sunday, October 04, 2020

Charles Rammelkamp on Jadeite: Hard to Put Down


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Thursday, October 01, 2020

Today is Jadeite Day


Happy Jadeite Day!

The adventure begins today: The Color of Jadeite is being released by Loyola University's Apprentice House Press.

Clive Allan leads his partner and sidekicks on an adventure through modern-day China, steeped in history and culture, in this literary thriller.

New York Times Bestselling author of 19 thrillers, Steve Berry, calls The Color of Jadeite "a tight, taut, terrific thriller." 

Jacquelyn Mitchard, who became Oprah's first book club pick with The Deep End of the Ocean, calls The Color of Jadeite "as tense, romantic, and obsessed as the great noir thrillers."

And Jerry Holt, author of The Killing of Strangers, calls The Color of Jadeite "The Maltese Falcon on high-octane." 

Take a look at the book trailer, read more reviews and endorsements, and learn more about the book at www.EricDGoodman.com/Jadeite.html.

Join the adventure by picking up your copy today, and please share with other readers!


Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The Adventure Begins Tomorrow

   


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Monday, September 28, 2020

Lucrecia Guerrero on Jadeite: Will Keep You Holding Your Breath


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Thursday, September 24, 2020

Austin Camacho on Jadeite: Nail-Biting Suspense

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Monday, September 21, 2020

Jacquelyn Mitchard on Jadeite: Tense, Romantic, Obsessed


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Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Steve Berry on Jadeite: A Tight, Taut, Terrific Thriller


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Sunday, September 13, 2020

Join the Quest for Jadeite


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Friday, September 11, 2020

Silk, Gardens, Canals, and Bridges in Suzhou


Known as the "Venice of the East," Suzhou is an ancient city where you can glide through a canal by boat, walk on a thousand-year-old market street, and linger in a peaceful garden. And if you want to visit a museum or go shopping, you can do both at the same time by exploring Suzhou's greatest export: silk.

Join me on an exploration of Suzhou in this travel story published by HackWriters.

https://www.hackwriters.com/SuzhouEDG.htm


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Wednesday, September 09, 2020

Book Trailer: The Color of Jadeite

 



Take a minute to experience the new book trailer for The Color of Jadeite.

The Color of Jadeite is a literary thriller that takes private detective Clive Allan on an adventure to China in search of an ancient jadeite tablet from the Ming Dynasty. Navigating fistfights and rickshaw chases, gunfights and betrayals, Clive finds much more than a monetary treasure on this quest.

Find out more by watching the book trailer, which was released today! 

https://youtu.be/WdlimGHgBKQ

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Friday, September 04, 2020

Book Trailer Premiere: The Color of Jadeite


If you have a minute or two on Wednesday, September 9 at noon, join me on Youtube for the premiere of the new book trailer for The Color of Jadeite.

The Color of Jadeite is a literary thriller that takes private detective Clive Allan on an adventure to China in search of an ancient jadeite tablet from the Ming Dynasty. Navigating fistfights and rickshaw chases, gunfights and betrayals, Clive finds much more than a monetary treasure on this quest.

Find out more by watching the book trailer at noon this coming Wednesday, September 9 at the link below.

https://youtu.be/WdlimGHgBKQ



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Thursday, September 03, 2020

Booksmuggler Features Rain and Pain



The online literary journal The Booksmuggler’s Den published “Rain and Pain” in the most recent issue.

 

“Rain and Pain” is an excerpt from the novel, Setting the Family Free.

 

The Booksmuggler’s Den published work by the latest and most celebrated authors.

 

Celebrate with “Rain and Pain” in The Booksmuggler’s Den!

 

https://booksmugglersden.com/portfolio/issue-12-march-2020/

 


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Friday, August 28, 2020

Shanghai's Life in the Fast Lane


Beijing has it's Imperial history, Hangzhou has it's West Lake and Dragon Well Tea, Xi'an has the Terracotta Army, but for modern day life in the fast lane, there's no better place to visit than Shanghai.

The twisted side streets still wind within pockets of the city, as does the colonial buildings of the Bundt, but for the most part you'll notice the museum of skyscrapers and modern buildings.

Join me for a tour of Shanghai in this travel story published by HackWriters.

https://www.hackwriters.com/ShanghaiEDG.htm

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Friday, August 21, 2020

Take Time for Tea (Fit for an Emperor)


In our new work-at-home quarantine reality, there's more time than ever to take time for a regular afternoon tea. How about sampling tea fit for an emperor?

We did just that when we visited Hangzhou's Longjing Village and sampled Dragon Well Tea for ourselves. Set within the rolling green tea hills, taking part in the roasting process ourselves, we enjoyed the tea that was once exclusively for the emperor of China and his guests alone. 

Find out more. Steep yourself a cup of tea and read my travel story in Go World Travel.

https://www.goworldtravel.com/hangzhou-dragon-well-tea-china/


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Wednesday, August 12, 2020

The Fictional Café Features Traffic Report



A morning cup of joe and a healthy dose of fiction is a great way to start the day—or a great break in the afternoon. Grab yourself a coup of coffee or tea and drop in on The Fictional Café where the baristas regularly serve fresh fiction.

 

My story “Traffic Report” was featured in The Fictional Café. “Traffic Report” is an excerpt from my novel, Setting the Family Free.

 

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Friday, August 07, 2020

Go Nomad Goes to Xi'an


Another travel story I wrote shortly after returning from my tour of China was published by Go Nomad. "Xi'an: The Cradle of Unified China" explores the ancient city of Xi'an and its most notable citizens: the terracotta warriors. This army of life-sized soldiers, the most important archaeological discover of the 20th century, is a marvel. We get into the pit, and meet one of the farmers who found them.

Also in Xi'an, we visit another great wall, the bell and drum towers, and experience some close calls in a rickshaw. 

Join the adventure at Go Nomad.

https://www.gonomad.com/69389-xian-cradle-unified-china

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Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Readers React to Setting the Family Free



I’ve shared the published book reviews and the endorsements from such authors as Junot Díaz and Jacqueline Mitchard. What do regular readers have to say about Setting the Family Free?

With 19 ratings and reviews on GoodReads and an average score of 4.89 out of 5, and 5 reviews on Amazon with an average score of 5 out of 5, the reviews are enough to make any author purr.

“It’s a compelling story told by a skillful, adventurous writer.”

“His unique writing style is addictive.”

“This book had me hooked from page one.’

“The strength lies not just in the story, but in the voice and in the lush, everyday details that make the characters real people.”

Read more—or leave your own review!

Goodreads:


Amazon:


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Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Something So Right about Armchair Travel



Feeling walled in by the lack of travel opportunities? 


In 1972, nearly 50 years ago, Paul Simon recorded "Something So Right." The song came to mind this morning as I share a travel story.

       They've got a wall in China
       It's a thousand miles long
       To keep out the foreigners
       They made it strong
       I've got a wall around me
       You can't even see
       It took a little time
       To get to me

Of course, Simon is writing about something more personal than the Great Wall of China. But with Trump's talk of building walls, our situation of being walled into isolation by the pandemic, my former travel to the Great Wall of China, and my travel story about that visit, along with the forthcoming release of my thriller with a scene set there, The Color of Jadeite, something sounds right about "Something So Right" being in my head.

Take a walk on the wall with me. Read my story, "World's Greatest Wall," in Go World Travel.

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Friday, July 17, 2020

Goodman has a Good Ear for this Sort of Thing



The Internet Review of Books published a review of Setting the Family Free. The reviewer is a former journalist and author of a Boston art guide.

I share the good, I share the bad, I share them both and there you have ... reality. Readers of Writeful know that I don’t share only the good reviews. When the rare negative review rears its head, I share it. Although the reviewer did have some good things to say, such as "Goodman has a good ear for this sort of thing," I would consider it a negative review.

The reviewer’s first quarrel with the book: how does a man open the doors and cut holes in the dozens of wire cages in a reasonable amount of time. My answer, assuming one is wanted: my character, like the real person it was inspired by, just took the time and did it. Why did the animals not attack him? Because they were used to spending time with him as he often got in their cages. They didn’t think to attack their owner or at least didn’t act upon it. They considered him their alpha, their family.

I was surprised when the reviewer mentioned a leopard killed a television reporter, which did not happen and made me wonder whether the review is based on a read or a scan. The leopard killed a female police officer; the reporter was elsewhere.

Marty Carlock summarizes her review by professing to be a connoisseur of good writing, which she cannot define: “As the quote goes, you know it when you see it.” She says she didn’t see it from Eric C. Goodman.

Whew. For a moment, I though she was talking about the writing of Eric D. Goodman.

You can read her full review of Setting the Family Free at The Internet Review of Books.



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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

ArLiJo Features “Horseback”



The Arlington Literary Journal, known by regular reads as ArLiJo, has published my story, “Horseback” in issue 136.

“Horseback” is an excerpt and stand-alone story from my novel, Setting the Family Free.

Check out the story, and the full issue, with other fiction, poetry, and photography, at the link below.


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Tuesday, July 07, 2020

Steve Berry on Jadeite: A Tight, Taut, Terrific Thriller



Steve Berry knows a thing or two (or twenty) about adventure thrillers. He’s the New York Times bestselling author of 19 novels, including The Amber Room, The Romanov Prophecy, The Alexandria Link, and The Emperor’s Tomb

Some have compared his work to that of Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code, Inferno), centered on adventure quests and measured in thrills per page.

So to receive an endorsement from a thriller-novel master is like finding a long-lost treasure.

Steve Berry calls The Color of Jadeite “a tight, taut, terrific thriller.”

Learn more about Steve Berry and his work at www.SteveBerry.org.

Learn more about The Color of Jadeite at www.EricDGoodman.com/Jadeite.html.

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Saturday, July 04, 2020

Independence, Syndic Style


The July 4, 2020 edition of Syndic Literary Journal is all about the Independence Day. It includes my short story, “Flag in the Road.” You can read it, or listen to an emotional reading by Charles Rammelkamp!

Charles Rammelkamp has his own work in this issue of Syndic, as does Nitin Jagdish, Matt Horner, LeRoy Chatfield, and more!


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Wednesday, July 01, 2020

Come With Me to Beijing with Baltimore Style


Before writing an adventure thriller set in China, I wrote travel stories about China. 

Learn about some of the exotic settings you'll encounter in The Color of Jadeite by visiting them in my published travel stories.

This one, on Imperial Beijing, was published in Baltimore Style Magazine.

https://baltimorestyle.com/crickets-and-dragons/

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Saturday, June 27, 2020

Join the Adventure



The Advance Reading Copies for my new literary adventure thriller, The Color of Jadeite, are available for your reading pleasure now. This is your opportunity to receive a free copy of the novel.

Print and ebook ARCs are available for reviewers. Many will go on the adventure by reading the book—why not be a part of the adventure by taking it a step further and writing a review for publication in a review journal, magazine, newspaper, or website or for posting on GoodReads or Amazon?

If you’d like a free ARC, please PM me on Facebook or email me at edgewriter@gmail.com.

The Color of Jadeite is being published by Loyola’s Apprentice House Press this fall. 


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Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Pennsylvania Literary Journal Features “Old Spruce”



My story, “Old Spruce” is featured in the most recent issue of Pennsylvania Literary Journal. Along with other fiction and poetry, the nearly 450-page issue features academic essays, literary criticism, and more.

Some readers may remember an earlier version of my story “Old Spruce.” I read an earlier, shorter version, “Leaving,” on Baltimore’s NPR station years ago. The story of a woman who lets her yard go wild at the advice of the tree at its center, this is a story that began back around 2003 at the same time I had begun writing stories to include in Tracks: A Novel in Stories.

The Pennsylvania Literary Journal Spring 2020 issue is offered online as a PDF, or you can purchase a print copy




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Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Jadeite Uncovered



In my new novel, The Color of Jadeite, there are a number of scenes in which Clive Allan and his sidekicks, with a sense of anticipation and wonder, uncover a new clue or old artifact.

That’s sort of how I felt when the package arrived on my doorstep and I, along with my family, unboxed the Advance Reading Copies of my new literary thriller.

Print and ebook ARCs are available for reviewers. Many will go on the adventure by reading the book—why not be a part of the adventure by taking it a step further and writing a review for publication in a review journal, magazine, newspaper, or website or for posting on GoodReads or Amazon?

If you’d like a free ARC, please PM me on Facebook or email me at edgewriter@gmail.com.

The Color of Jadeite is being published by Loyola’s Apprentice House Press this fall. Learn more at www.EricDGoodman.com/China.html.

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Friday, June 12, 2020

Listopedia Loves Setting the Family Free


You may be aware that Setting the Family Free is well-reviewed on GoodReads, with 20 ratings, 7 reviews, and an average rating of 4.85 out of 5. But did you know that the novel has also made several of their Listopia Lists?

Setting the Family Free is the number 1 book our of 367 entries on the list for books about animal/human relationships. Number 1 out of 145 on the "Favorite Animal Stories" list. It's number 2 out of 209 on the "Animal Stories" list, right after Watership Down. It comes in at number 5 for "Animal Attacks," beaten down heavyweights like Jaws and Cujo

As of this writing, it is also currently number 1 on the lists for Airport Reads, Books that make you think, and Great books for travel.  

The lists ebb and flow, but it's good to have Setting the Family Free included on them. See the current lists for yourself at the link.


https://www.goodreads.com/list/book/50094058

Tuesday, June 09, 2020

Jadeite Cover Revealed



Apprentice House has designed the cover for my new novel, The Color of Jadeite, and you could say it is etched in stone.

The Color of Jadeite is a literary thriller full of intrigue, romance, treacherous villains, alluring clues, narrow escapes, and surprises around every corner.

With sidekicks Salvador and Mackenzie, Clive Allan sets out to find the priceless artifact, outwitting their rivals at almost every turn. But between the fistfights and rickshaw chases, gunfights and betrayals, Clive’s deep connection with the treasure he seeks and his romance with Wei Wei force him to confront truths about his past and himself.

Check out the cover and learn more about The Color of Jadeite at www.EricDGoodman.com/China.html.



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Wednesday, June 03, 2020

Armchair Travel Staycation


Are you planning your summer staycation?

Why not consider joining me and visiting some of these armchair travel destinations?

From China to the Baltics, from Dubai to Spain, you'll find photos and travel adventures at my travel site.

 www.EricDGoodman.com/travel.html


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Friday, May 29, 2020

“Rusted” in Scarlet Leaf Review



Scarlet. Rusted. Both red. And both read.

My short story, “Rusted,” was published in the April issue of Scarlet Leaf Review.

“Rusted” is set in the sweltering heat of Baltimore’s Artscape. Drawn in by an unusual sculpture, the narrator gets to know an even more unusual woman. The encounter draws up memories of the past—and reimagined conversations—that he’d rather forget.

Read “Rusted” and other fine stories in Scarlet Leaf Review.


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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

New Book is a Literary Adventure Thriller



I have a new novel coming out this fall!

The Color of Jadeite will be published by Loyola’s Apprentice House Books this fall.

The Color of Jadeite is a literary adventure thriller full of intrigue, romance, treacherous villains, alluring clues, narrow escapes, and surprises around every corner. 

Clive Allen, a suave private eye, ventures throughout China in search of an ancient jadeite tablet from the Ming dynasty. Along the way, he delves into the mysteries of China’s art, history, and culture.

Every bit as captivating as the treasure Clive seeks is the mysterious Wei Wei, an expert on Chinese artifacts who helps the droll detective navigate the most perilous pockets of Beijing, Shanghai, Xi’an, Hangzhou, Suzhou, and beyond.

With sidekicks Salvador and Mackenzie, Clive sets out to find the priceless artifact, outwitting their rivals at almost every turn. But between the fistfights and rickshaw chases, gunfights and betrayals, Clive’s deep connection with the treasure he seeks and his romance with Wei Wei force him to confront truths about his past and himself.

More details will be revealed as they’re uncovered at www.EricDGoodman.com/China.html.

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Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Find Time for No Time in The Opiate Magazine



My story, “No Time” is published in The Opiate Magazine, Vol. 21.

The Opiate Magazine is an English-language literary magazine based in Paris, France and is available both in print and online.

“No Time” is described by the editor as an “epic slow burn of a friendship betrayal.”

I wrote the first draft years ago, around 2005, prompted by a workshop assignment to imagine something in my life that may have been seen in a negative light to others. I imagined what it must have looked like to friends and family when I returned from a semester in Russia to announce I’d fallen in love, and after I went back a few months later to get married. Nataliya and I were absolutely certain—and rightly so as our 25 years of marriage illustrate. But I imagine others, at the time, must have thought we were crazy, two people from different sides of the globe getting married after knowing one another less than a year.

For the seed to become a story—from the point of view of the friend—I had to take it several steps beyond. Thus the story of love became a story of questionable morals and betrayal.

Whether you order the print copy of the magazine or read it online for free, you’ll find “No Time” on pages 31-41 of the issue.

Enjoy it and the other fine stories and poetry in The Opiate Magazine.




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Thursday, May 07, 2020

My Story "Ginger" Published in Modern Literature



My story, “Ginger” is published in the most recent issue of Modern Literature.

Modern Literature is an international English-language literary magazine based in Chennai, India that showcases the latest trends in literature.

“Ginger” is the story of a family dog and how each member of a family deals with loss.

I wrote the first draft of “Ginger” a few years ago, but the origin of the story goes way, way back.

When I was a child (already identifying as a writer), my family had a dog named “Ginger.” When we had to give her away prior to moving to Japan, I vowed to write a book about her. A year passed, then another. I began to realize the book couldn’t be about a regular mutt—it would be my life story told through the filter of the dog. I even have the first few pages of a draft on a yellow legal pad from childhood.

With age and some amount of maturity, I understood there would never be a book about Ginger. But, doggedly determined to fulfill the vow, as I glanced over the handwritten pages of that childhood beginning, I decided that perhaps a story about the dog could be managed.

The result of that seed is the story just published. 

Note that although motivated by our pet and situation, the story is complete fiction and does not reflect true perspectives, feelings, or viewpoints of real family members depicted in the story.

But, like most good fiction, it is true.

Enjoy “Ginger” and the other fine stories and poetry in Modern Literature.



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Monday, May 04, 2020

Get to It


As I enter my third month of Covid-19 quarantine, my daily work schedule and writing schedule have kept me as busy as ever. However, I’ve managed to take advantage of the saved commute and prep time and have been polishing and submitting some of my short fiction.

The result: 9 stories have been accepted for publication by literary journals and magazines, some in print and others online.

Some of the stories find their roots in rough drafts from as far back as 2007. Others are excerpts from my most recently published novel, Setting the Family Free. One of them I’ve already shared: “It was the Neighbor Who First Noticed Something Amiss” in the most recent issue of Loch Raven Review. Others have been accepted but won’t be published for a few months.

In the days, weeks, and months ahead I’ll share the stories as they’re published here.

I’m not sure why so many people are saying they’re bored during the pandemic. Sure, there are a lot of activities we miss. But there are so many things you can be doing, whether writing, reviewing, submitting, reading, catching up on the books you’ve been putting off, streaming the television series that’s just too long to commit to, dusting off the board games. 

Get to it!

And, if you miss people, we’ll always have Facebook.



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Thursday, April 30, 2020

Lit and Art Looks to the Future



Manzar's Maagu painting, indicating silence, seems fitting in describing readings and literary events of the past several weeks. 

You don’t need us to tell you that the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted us all. We had a strong start to the Lit and Art Reading Series for 2020 back in January with readers Linda Joy Burke, Austin Camacho, Katherine Cottle, Lauren Beth Eisenberg Davis, Deanna Nikaido, and Judith Krummeck at The Ivy Bookshop’s Bird-in-Hand location.

However, we had to cancel the March 28 House Concert which would have featured Dan Cuddy, Jen Grow, Nathan Leslie, Nitin Jagdish, and music by Pinto. And we cancelled our April event that would have featured the work of Clarinda Harriss, Matt Honer, Danuta Kosk-Kosicka, Heather Rounds, Patricia Schultheis, and more.

From where we stand now, we’re not sure when we’ll resume our usual schedule. If there is a Baltimore Book Festival this September or November, Lit & Art has been a staple of the festival going back more than a decade and you can probably expect us to be a part of it. Beyond the book fest, we hope things are back to normal in time for us to proceed with our November event at The Ivy’s Bird in Hand location, featuring David Eberhardt, Dan Fesperman, g emil reuter, Charles Rammelkamp, and Diane Sahms-Guarnieri.

Whether we resume later this year or in 2021, we look forward to inviting all of this year’s readers who missed out to join us for the next events.

In the meantime, please take a look at the authors and poets mentioned in this post and check out their books, many of them available as hardcovers and paperbacks delivered to your doorstep, or as ebooks. It is more important than ever to support small-press authors as well as artists and small business.

We’ll get through this together. Only apart. Sort of.

Check our Lit and Art Facebook page for the latest on future events and other related news and announcements.



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Friday, April 03, 2020

Like Tiger King? You'll Love Setting the Family Free!



Tiger King is the number one show on Netflix right now.

Hungry for more? Check out Setting the Family Free, my novel inspired by some of the events featured in Tiger King!

Published by Loyola's Apprentice House last fall, lauded by Junot Diaz as "supremely moving, ferocious and tender" and by Jacqueline Mitchard as "a generous, boisterous, surprising read, like a tiger in your back yard," Setting the Family Free is available now as a hardcover, paperback, and ebook!



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Wednesday, April 01, 2020

No Fooling: The Goodmans Relocated



Today the Goodman family announced their relocation. 

After residing for one year in downtown Baltimore’s Federal Hill and 19 years in the Rodgers Forge neighborhood, they have vacated their rowhouse and moved to a new home.

“It was just getting too crowded in our rowhouse,” said Nicole Goodman, 21. “Between the souvenirs they buy when traveling and all of Dad’s books, it was starting to feel like we lived in a warehouse.”

“Actually, it was more like a library with a cabinet of curiosities,” Alexander Goodman, 15, corrected.

Tied to the local literary community—and their careers and schools—the Goodmans decided not to move too far away. They resisted the temptation to move to Canada.

“Alex just got into Carver Center for the Arts, and Nicole’s still at Towson University’s Honors College, so we wanted to make sure they could still attend and we could still make it to work,” Nataliya Goodman, 49, stated.

The new home, Wineberry House, is in the Manor Hills neighborhood of Glen Arm, just 15 minutes from their old home. They can now walk to Loch Raven hiking trails they used to drive to. They're in the woods, but only minutes from civilization.

“Close enough to still consider myself a Baltimore writer,” Eric D. Goodman, 48, insisted.

This summer, once they're closer to unpacked and settled in, the Goodmans plan to host a housewarming party, assuming people are permitted to gather once again. A splendid time is guaranteed for all.




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Wednesday, March 18, 2020

The Bearable Lightness of Being in Czech Republic



Here’s a travel story published a couple years ago I don’t think I ever got around to sharing.

"The Bearable Lightness of Being in Czech Republic" is a  travel story published by inTravel Magazine in three parts during 2017 and 2018.

If you’re sitting at home worrying about the Corona virus, enjoy some armchair travel at the link below!


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